The NIH Pain Consortium Mitchell Max Award for Research Excellence honors Dr. Mitchell Max, MD (1949 – 2008) for his lifetime contribution to pain research and is awarded annually to the best poster presentation at the NIH Pain Consortium Symposium.

2017 Mitchell Max Award winner Cameron Randall
2017 Mitchell Max Awardee:
Doctoral candidate, West Virginia University

Mitchell B. Max, MD
1949-2008
Photo of Mitchell Max

Mitchell B. Max, MD, was a visiting professor of anesthesiology, medicine, and human genetics and director of the Molecular Epidemiology of Pain Program at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Pain Research. He received his undergraduate degree from Yale University and his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He completed a fellowship in neurology and pharmacology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, studying the pharmacokinetics of opioid drugs. He was appointed medical director of the Pain Research Clinic in the pain and neurosensory mechanisms branch of the NIH National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR). For over two decades, he conducted research on the mechanisms and treatment of analgesics and neuropathic pain and published extensively. From 2005 to 2007 he was chief of the clinical pain research section of NIDCR. Dr. Max was a fellow of the American Neurological Association since 1990, a member of the AAN (1988–1990), and a member of the American Pain Society (APS). At the APS, he served as secretary from 1988–1990, chair of the Quality Improvement Committee (1988–1995), member of the Decade of Pain Research Planning Committee (2002–2008), and chair of the Analgesic Guidelines Committee (1986–2002), which produced the influential monograph Principles of Analgesic Use in the Treatment of Acute Pain and Cancer Pain. His multiple honors and awards include the APS Wilbert E. Fordyce Clinical Investigator Award (1996), the US Public Health Service Citation Award (1986), and the NIH Director's Award (1993).

Recent Recipients
2016
Joseph W. Ditre
Syracuse University

Nicotine Deprivation Increases Pain Sensitivity, Neurogenic Inflammation, and Secondary Hyperalgesia among Daily Tobacco Smokers

2015
Mark Pitcher, Ph.D.
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Effect of voluntary exercise in a rat model of persistent inflammatory pain

2014
Fadel Zeidan, Ph.D.
Wake Forest School of Medicine

Neural Mechanisms supporting Mindfulness-based Pain Relief as Compared to Placebo Analgesia